#The Post Soviet Russian Media PDF

Download full The Post Soviet Russian Media Book or read online anytime anywhere, Available in PDF, ePub and Kindle. Click Get Books and find your favorite books in the online library. Create free account to access unlimited books, fast download and ads free! We cannot guarantee that book is in the library. READ as many books as you like (Personal use).

The Post Soviet Russian Media

by Birgit Beumers
Publisher: Routledge
Release Date: 2008-11-26
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
Pages: 264 pages
ISBN 13: 1134112394
ISBN 10: 9781134112395
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

GET EBOOK

Synopsis : The Post Soviet Russian Media written by Birgit Beumers, published by Routledge which was released on 2008-11-26. Download The Post Soviet Russian Media Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. This book explores developments in the Russian mass media since the collapse of the USSR in 1991. -- This book explores developments in the Russian mass media since the collapse of the USSR in 1991. Complementing and building upon its companion volume, Television and Culture in Putin's Russia: Remote Control, it traces the tensions resulting from the effective return to state-control under Putin of a mass media privatised and accorded its first, limited, taste of independence in the Yeltsin period. It surveys the key developments in Russian media since 1991, including the printed press, television and new media, and investigates the contradictions of the post-Soviet media market that have affected the development of the media sector in recent years. It analyses the impact of the Putin presidency, including the ways in which the media have constructed Putin’s image in order to consolidate his power and their role in securing his election victories in 2000 and 2004. It goes on to consider the status and function of journalism in post-Soviet Russia, discussing the conflict between market needs and those of censorship, the gulf that has arisen separating journalists from their audiences. The relationship between television and politics is examined, and also the role of television as entertainment, as well as its role in nation building and the projection of a national identity. Finally, it appraises the increasingly important role of new media and the internet. Overall, this book is a detailed investigation of the development of mass media in Russia since the end of Communism and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

RELATED BOOKS
The Post-Soviet Russian Media
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Birgit Beumers, Stephen Hutchings, Natalia Rulyova
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-11-26 - Publisher: Routledge

This book explores developments in the Russian mass media since the collapse of the USSR in 1991. Complementing and building upon its companion volume, Television and Culture in Putin's Russia: Remote Control, it traces the tensions resulting from the effective return to state-control under Putin of a mass media privatised and accorded its first, limited, taste of independence in the Yeltsin period. It surveys the key developments in Russian media since 1991, including the printed press, television and new media, and investigates the contradictions of the post-Soviet media market that have affected the development of the media sector in recent years. It analyses the impact of the Putin presidency, including the ways in which the media have constructed Putin’s image in order to consolidate his power and their role in securing his election victories in 2000 and 2004. It goes on to consider the status and function of journalism in post-Soviet Russia, discussing the conflict between market needs and those of censorship, the gulf that has arisen separating journalists from their audiences. The relationship between television and politics is examined, and also the role of television as entertainment, as well as its role in nation building and the projection of a national identity. Finally, it appraises the increasingly important role of new media and the internet. Overall, this book is a detailed investigation of the development of mass media in Russia since the end of Communism and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Media and Power in Post-Soviet Russia
Language: en
Pages: 316
Authors: Ivan Ivanovich Zassoursky
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-16 - Publisher: Routledge

This book describes the rise of independent mass media in Russia, from the loosening of censorship under Gorbachev's policy of glasnost to the proliferation of independent newspapers and the rise of media barons during the Yeltsin years. The role of the Internet, the impact of the 1998 financial crisis, the succession of Putin, and the effort to reimpose central power over privately controlled media empires mark the end of the first decade of a Russian free press. Throughout the book, there is a focus on the close intermingling of political power and media power, as the propaganda function of the press in fact never disappeared, but rather has been harnessed to multiple and conflicting ideological interests. More than a guide to the volatile Russian media scene and its players, Media and Power in Post-Soviet Russia poses questions of importance and relevance in any functioning democracy.
The Media System in Russia
Language: en
Pages: 32
Authors: Veronika Streuer
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-06 - Publisher: GRIN Verlag

Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject Communications - Mass Media, grade: 64%, Coventry University, course: Global Media and Communications (within the MA Global Journalism), language: English, abstract: This essay analyses the Russian media system on the basis of the concept of comparing media systems developed by Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini in 2004. Therefore a brief sketch about the Russian media system is given in the second section of this essay. Section three contains an overview about Hallin and Mancini's approach of comparing media systems, which also will be discussed briefly. The advantages and drawbacks of using this concept on Russia will also be pointed out. In section four the tool mentioned above will be used to analyse the Russian media system. In section five it is discussed whether the Russian media system could fit in one of the three models approached by Hallin and Mancini. Concluding this essay suggests the development of a new fourth model to describe the specifics of Post-Soviet countries.
Globalisation, Freedom and the Media after Communism
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Birgit Beumers, Stephen Hutchings, Natalia Rulyova
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-18 - Publisher: Routledge

This book examines the fate of post-Soviet press freedom and media culture in the context of the growing impact of globalisation. To understand the complicated situation that has arisen with respect to these issues in post-Soviet space is impossible without collaboration between political scientists, sociologists, cultural analysts, media studies researchers and media practitioners. The book is one of the first attempts to bridge the gaps between political and cultural studies approaches, between textual analysis and audience research, as well as between practitioner-led and scholarly approaches to the post-Soviet media The cumulative impact of the essays contained in this section is to reinforce the intuition which inspired it: that the post-Soviet media remain a highly heterogeneous, complex and dynamic field for investigation. With contributions from scholars and journalists across Europe (including the former Soviet Union), the collection addresses such issues as censorship and elections, the legacy of the Soviet past, terrorism and the media, the post-Soviet business press, advertising and nation building, official press discourse and entrepreneurship, and global formats on Russian television. This book was originally published as a special issue of Europe-Asia Studies.
Revolution Stalled
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Sarah Oates
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-02 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Can the internet fundamentally challenge non-free regimes? The role that social networking has played in promoting political change in the Middle East and beyond raises important questions about the ability of authoritarian leaders to control the information sphere and their subjects. Revolution Stalled goes beyond the idea of "virtual" politics to study five key components in the relationship between the online sphere and society: content, community, catalysts, control, and co-optation. This analysis of the contemporary Russian internet, written by a scholar with in-depth knowledge of both the post-Soviet media and media theory, illuminates key components to how and when the internet can spark political action. With its analysis of current internet-linked protests in Russia, this book posits that there are critical pre-conditions that must exist for the internet to be used successfully to challenge non-free states. In particular, Russian leaders have made themselves vulnerable to online protest movements and online social entrepreneurs through their failure to control the internet as effectively as they have controlled traditional media. At the same time, Russia has experienced explosive growth in the online audience, tipping the balance of control away from state-run television and toward the more open online sphere. Oates incorporates studies of small-scale protests involving health issues and children with disabilities to demonstrate that Russians have started to translate individual grievances into rising political awareness and efficacy via the online sphere. Her cases show that the Russian state has struggled to change its information and control strategy in the face of new types of information dissemination, networking, and protest. This new environment has transformed a state strategy of co-opted elections into a powerful catalyst for protests and demands for rights. While the revolution remains stalled, this book provides compelling evidence that a new and changing generation of internet users is beginning to alter the balance of power in the public sphere in Russia.
Trends in Post-Soviet Media Consumption
Language: en
Pages: 210
Authors: Katherina M. Wierschke
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher:

Media assessments produced by organizations such as Freedom House, Reporters Without Borders (RSF), and the International Research & Exchanges Board (IREX) provide a useful benchmark for gauging levels of media freedom in the post-Soviet world. However, these evaluations do not necessarily provide a complete picture of the media landscapes they assess, neglecting to factor in the effects of media consumption on democratic outcomes. This point is particularly relevant in the cases of Georgia and Ukraine, considering that both states have been the target of Russian aggression through both military and information warfare. This analysis provides a clearer picture of the interaction between trends in media consumption, effects of Russian disinformation narratives, and democratic media in Georgia and Ukraine, ultimately arguing that Russian disinformation narratives succeed in Georgia because they are disguised by nationalist rhetoric, while these same efforts fail in Ukraine due to the enforcement of censorship policies targeting Russian media sources and the implementation of nationwide media literacy campaigns. These findings have significant implications for short- and long-term understandings of democratic media and media freedom in the post-Soviet space
Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society
Language: en
Pages: 130
Authors: Julie Fedor, Andriy Portnov, Andreas Umland
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-01 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

The Russian war in Ukraine has been accompanied, fuelled, and legitimized by a Russian information war campaign that is unprecedented in its scope and nature. This Russian state-media propaganda campaign has been surprisingly successful in disguising and distorting the nature of the war and shaping the way it is perceived and understood, both in Russia and beyond. This special inaugural issue of JSPPS sets out to launch an interdisciplinary discussion on the Russian information warfare being waged in parallel with the military war in Ukraine.The JOURNAL OF SOVIET AND POST-SOVIET POLITICS AND SOCIETY (JSPPS) is a new bi-annual journal about to be launched as a companion journal to the Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society (SPPS) book series (founded 2004 and edited by Andreas Umland, Dr. phil., PhD).
The Dark Double
Language: en
Pages: 208
Authors: Andrei P. Tsygankov
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Although many observers argue that US-Russia relations are a simple reflection of elites' political and economic preferences in both countries, these preferences tend to arise from pre-existing belief systems that are deeply rooted in the public and accentuated by mass media. In Dark Double, Andrei P. Tsygankov focuses on the driving power of values and media, in addition to political and economic interests, in structuring US-Russia relations. By analyzing mainstream US newspapers and other media sources, Tsygankov identifies five media narratives involving Russia since the Cold War's end and studies them through a framework of three inter-related factors: historic and cultural differences between the two countries, inter-state competition, and polarizing domestic politics. He shows how Americans' negative views toward Russia draw from a deep wellspring of suspicion and are further enhanced by a biased media that regularly exploits such negativity, Russia's centralization of power and anti-American attitudes. Given the intensity of our current impasse with Russia, Dark Double represents an important intervention that forces us to think about the sources of conflict in a new way.
Fortress Russia
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Ilya Yablokov
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-08-27 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Allegations of Russian conspiracies meddling in the affairs of Western countries have been a persistent feature of Western politics since the Cold War – allegations of Russian interference in the US presidential election are only the most recent in a long series of conspiracy allegations that mark the history of the twentieth century. But Russian politics is rife with conspiracies about the West too. Everything bad that happens in Russia is traced back by some to an anti-Russian plot that is hatched in the West. Even the collapse of the Soviet Union – this crucial turning point in world politics that left the USA as the only remaining superpower – was, according to some Russian conspiracy theorists, planned and executed by Russia’s enemies in the West. This book is the first-ever study of Russian conspiracy theories in the post-Soviet period. It examines why these conspiracy theories have emerged and gained currency in Russia and what role intellectuals have played in this process. The book shows how, in the new millennium, the image of the ‘dangerous, conspiring West’ provides national unity and has helped legitimize Russia’s rapid turn to authoritarianism under Vladimir Putin.
Television and Culture in Putin's Russia
Language: en
Pages: 258
Authors: Stephen Hutchings, Natalia Rulyova
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-06-02 - Publisher: Routledge

This book examines television culture in Russia under the government of Vladimir Putin. In recent years, the growing influx into Russian television of globally mediated genres and formats has coincided with a decline in media freedom and a ratcheting up of government control over the content style of television programmes. All three national channels (First, Russia, NTV) have fallen victim to Putin’s power-obsessed regime. Journalists critical of his Chechnya policy have been subject to harassment and arrest; programmes courting political controversy, such as Savik Shuster’s Freedom of Speech (Svoboda slova) have been taken off the air; coverage of national holidays like Victory Day has witnessed a return of Soviet-style bombast; and reporting on crises, such as the Beslan tragedy, is severely curtailed. The book demonstrates how broadcasters have been enlisted in support of a transparent effort to install a latter-day version of imperial pride in Russian military achievements at the centre of a national identity project over which, from the depths of the Kremlin, Putin’s government exerts a form of remote control. However, central to the book's argument is the notion that because of the changes wrought upon Russian society after 1985, a blanket return to the totalitarianism of the Soviet media has, notwithstanding the tenor of much western reporting on the issue, not occurred. Despite the fact that television is nominally under state control, that control remains remote and less than wholly effective, as amply demonstrated in the audience research conducted for the book, and in analysis of contradictions at the textual level. Overall, this book provides a fascinating account of the role of television under President Putin, and will be of interest to all those wishing to understand contemporary Russian society.
Russian Mass Media and Changing Values
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Arja Rosenholm, Kaarle Nordenstreng, Elena Trubina
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-10-04 - Publisher: Routledge

This book provides a multi-faceted picture of the many complex processes taking place in the field of contemporary Russian media and popular culture. Russian social and cultural life today is strongly individualised and consumers are offered innumerable alternatives; but at the same time options are limited by the new technologies of control which are a key feature of Russian capitalism. Based on extensive original research by scholars in both Russia itself and in Finland, the book discusses new developments in the media industry and assesses a wide range of social and cultural changes, many of which are related to, and to an extent generated by, the media. The book argues that the Russian mass media industry, whilst facing the challenges of globalization, serves several purposes including making a profit, reinforcing patriotic discourse and popularizing liberalized lifestyles. Topics include changing social identities, new lifestyles, ideas of "glamour" and "professional values". Overall, the book demonstrates that the media in Russia is far from homogenous, and that, as in the West, despite new technologies of control, media audiences are being offered a new kind of pluralism which is profoundly influencing Russia's cultural, social and political landscape.
The Post-Soviet Russian Orthodox Church
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Katja Richters
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-08-21 - Publisher: Routledge

In recent years, the Russian Orthodox Church has become a more prominent part of post-Soviet Russia. A number of assumptions exist regarding the Church’s relationship with the Russian state: that the Church has always been dominated by Russia’s secular elites; that the clerics have not sufficiently fought this domination and occasionally failed to act in the Church’s best interest; and that the Church was turned into a Soviet institution during the twentieth century. This book challenges these assumptions. It demonstrates that church-state relations in post-communist Russia can be seen in a much more differentiated way, and that the church is not subservient, very much having its own agenda. Yet at the same time it is sharing the state’s, and Russian society’s nationalist vision. The book analyses the Russian Orthodox Church’s political culture, focusing on the Putin and Medvedev eras from 2000. It examines the upper echelons of the Moscow Patriarchate in relation to the governing elite and to Russian public opinion, explores the role of the church in the formation of state religious policy, and the church’s role within the Russian military. It discusses how the Moscow Patriarchate is asserting itself in former Soviet republics outside Russia, especially in Estonia, Ukraine and Belarus. It concludes by re-emphasising that, although the church often mirrors the Kremlin’s political preferences, it most definitely acts independently.