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Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835-1905
Language: en
Pages: 184
Authors: Mary Ellis Gibson
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-15 - Publisher:

The five stories in 'Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835-1905' speculate about utopian and dystopian futures. They represent the earliest Indian science fiction, imagining futures ranging from an end-of-the-world deluge to violent revolution to feminist utopia.
Science Fiction in Colonial India, 18351905
Language: en
Pages: 184
Authors: Mary Ellis Gibson
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-30 - Publisher: Anthem Press

"Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835–1905" shows, for the first time, how science fiction writing developed in India years before the writings of Jules Verne and H. G. Wells. The five stories presented in this collection, in their cultural and political contexts, help form a new picture of English language writing in India and a new understanding of the connections among science fiction, modernity and empire. [NP] Speculative fiction developed early in India in part because the intrinsic dysfunction and violence of colonialism encouraged writers there to project alternative futures, whether utopian or dystopic. The stories in "Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835–1905," created by Indian and British writers, responded to the intellectual ferment and political instabilities of colonial India. They add an important dimension to our understanding of Victorian empire, science fiction and speculative fictional narratives. They provide new examples of the imperial and the anti-imperial imaginations at work.
Science Fiction in Colonial India, 18351905
Language: en
Pages: 184
Authors: Mary Ellis Gibson
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-30 - Publisher: Anthem Press

"Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835–1905" shows, for the first time, how science fiction writing developed in India years before the writings of Jules Verne and H. G. Wells. The five stories presented in this collection, in their cultural and political contexts, help form a new picture of English language writing in India and a new understanding of the connections among science fiction, modernity and empire. [NP] Speculative fiction developed early in India in part because the intrinsic dysfunction and violence of colonialism encouraged writers there to project alternative futures, whether utopian or dystopic. The stories in "Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835–1905," created by Indian and British writers, responded to the intellectual ferment and political instabilities of colonial India. They add an important dimension to our understanding of Victorian empire, science fiction and speculative fictional narratives. They provide new examples of the imperial and the anti-imperial imaginations at work.
The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature
Language: en
Pages: 540
Authors: Dennis Denisoff, Talia Schaffer
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-15 - Publisher: Routledge

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.
Unsound Empire
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Catherine L. Evans
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-09-28 - Publisher: Yale University Press

A study of the internal tensions of British imperial rule told through murder and insanity trials Unsound Empire is a history of criminal responsibility in the nineteenth‑century British Empire told through detailed accounts of homicide cases across three continents. If a defendant in a murder trial was going to hang, he or she had to deserve it. Establishing the mental element of guilt—criminal responsibility—transformed state violence into law. And yet, to the consternation of officials in Britain and beyond, experts in new scientific fields posited that insanity was widespread and growing, and evolutionary theories suggested that wide swaths of humanity lacked the self‑control and understanding that common law demanded. Could it be fair to punish mentally ill or allegedly “uncivilized” people? Could British civilization survive if killers avoided the noose?
Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Elizabeth Carolyn Miller
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-12 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

How literature of the British imperial world contended with the social and environmental consequences of industrial mining The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion worked its way into narrative form. Britain was the first nation to transition to industry based on fossil fuels, which put its novelists and other writers in the remarkable position of mediating the emergence of extraction-based life. Miller looks at works like Hard Times, The Mill on the Floss, and Sons and Lovers, showing how the provincial realist novel’s longstanding reliance on marriage and inheritance plots transforms against the backdrop of exhaustion to withhold the promise of reproductive futurity. She explores how adventure stories like Treasure Island and Heart of Darkness reorient fictional space toward the resource frontier. And she shows how utopian and fantasy works like “Sultana’s Dream,” The Time Machine, and The Hobbit offer imaginative ways of envisioning energy beyond extractivism. This illuminating book reveals how an era marked by violent mineral resource rushes gave rise to literary forms and genres that extend extractivism as a mode of environmental understanding.
Indian Science Fiction
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Suparno Banerjee
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-15 - Publisher: University of Wales Press

This study draws from postcolonial theory, science fiction criticism, utopian studies, genre theory, Western and Indian philosophy and history to propose that Indian science fiction functions at the intersection of Indian and Western cultures. The author deploys a diachronic and comparative approach in examining the multilingual science fiction traditions of India to trace the overarching generic evolutions, which he complements with an analysis of specific patterns of hybridity in the genre’s formal and thematic elements – time, space, characters and the epistemologies that build the worlds in Indian science fiction. The work explores the larger patterns and connections visible despite the linguistic and cultural diversities of Indian science fiction traditions.
Historical Abstracts
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Suparno Banerjee
Categories: History, Modern
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher:

Books about Historical Abstracts
Larousse Dictionary of Writers
Language: en
Pages: 1070
Authors: Rosemary Goring
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Larousse

This dictionary of writers, from the earliest Arabic poets to the bestselling authors of the present day, includes over 6,000 concise and pithy biographies