#Cosmopolitanism In The Tang Dynasty PDF

Download full Cosmopolitanism In The Tang Dynasty Book or read online anytime anywhere, Available in PDF, ePub and Kindle. Click Get Books and find your favorite books in the online library. Create free account to access unlimited books, fast download and ads free! We cannot guarantee that book is in the library. READ as many books as you like (Personal use).

China s Cosmopolitan Empire

by Mark Edward Lewis
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release Date: 2012-04-02
Genre: History
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN 13: 0674054199
ISBN 10: 9780674054196
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

GET EBOOK

Synopsis : China s Cosmopolitan Empire written by Mark Edward Lewis, published by Harvard University Press which was released on 2012-04-02. Download China s Cosmopolitan Empire Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its ... -- The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu.

RELATED BOOKS
China's Cosmopolitan Empire
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Mark Edward Lewis
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-04-02 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu.
Cosmopolitanism in the Tang Dynasty
Language: en
Pages: 104
Authors: Suzanne G. Valenstein
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-06-01 - Publisher: Transaction Publishers

This research monograph investigates the aspects of a large Tang dynasty (618–907) porcelaneous mortuary figure of an ethnic Sogdian that belongs to a small, cohesive group of Chinese ceramic figures depicting foreign wine merchants. As key merchants on the famous “Silk Road,” the Sogdians, an Eastern Iranian people, played a significant role in China’s exposure to Western cultures. The interaction among the Chinese, the Sogdians, and the Turkic Eurasian nomads left an indelible mark on Tang China as well. The book also considers the history of alcoholic beverages in China; ceramic technology; and the background of Chinese mortuary furnishings, known as mingqi. Various decorative motifs on the present figure and its analogous examples are traced both chronologically and geographically to their origins. Most of these motifs can be found in the West and most can also be associated with Buddhism, which came to China by way of Central Asia.
Hawaii Reader in Traditional Chinese Culture
Language: en
Pages: 756
Authors: Victor H. Mair, Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt, Paul R. Goldin
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-01-31 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

The Hawai‘i Reader in Traditional Chinese Culture is a collection of more than ninety primary sources—all but a few of which were translated specifically for this volume—of cultural significance from the Bronze Age to the turn of the twentieth century. They take into account virtually every aspect of traditional culture, including sources from the non-Sinitic ethnic minorities.
Chinese Migrations
Language: en
Pages: 254
Authors: Diana Lary
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-06-08 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

The current waves of migration sweeping the Chinese world may seem like new phenomena, the outcome of modernization and industrialization. However, this concise and readable book convincingly shows that contemporary movements are just the most recent stage in a long history of migration, both within China and beyond its borders. Distinguished historian Diana Lary traces the continuous expansion and contraction of the Chinese state over more than four millennia. Periods of expansion, which involved huge movements of people, have been interspersed with periods of inward-turning stasis. Following a chronological framework, the author discusses the migrations themselves and the recurrent themes within them. We see migration as a broad spectrum of movement, from short-term and short-range to permanent and long-range, and as a powerful vehicle for the transfer of commodities, culture, religion, and political influence. The Confucian tradition treated migration as undesirable. It praised the delights of staying at home: “A thousand days at home are good, half a day away is hard.” Lary argues that, despite this view, migration has been a key element in the evolution of Chinese society, one that the state disparages and encourages at the same time. Her book will be compelling for all readers who want to understand the context for the present internal and international migrations that have changed the face of China itself and its international relations.
China’s Cosmopolitan Empire
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Mark Edward Lewis
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-04-09 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu. The Chinese engaged in extensive trade on sea and land. Merchants from Inner Asia settled in the capital, while Chinese entrepreneurs set off for the wider world, the beginning of a global diaspora. The emergence of an economically and culturally dominant south that was controlled from a northern capital set a pattern for the rest of Chinese imperial history. Poems celebrated the glories of the capital, meditated on individual loneliness in its midst, and described heroic young men and beautiful women who filled city streets and bars. Despite the romantic aura attached to the Tang, it was not a time of unending peace. In 756, General An Lushan led a revolt that shook the country to its core, weakening the government to such a degree that by the early tenth century, regional warlordism gripped many areas, heralding the decline of the Great Tang.
Chinese As It Is
Language: en
Pages: 210
Authors: Conal Boyce
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing

Chinese As It Is: A 3D Sound Atlas is a relatively small volume (radical index + 190 pages of text) but its size is deceptive as it provides a carefully constructed window on the entire language. How so? The core of the book is a 60-page table comprised of four columns and 400 rows. Into this matrix, the sound system is loaded, then each cell is occupied by one or more characters, for a grand total of 2394 characters. Of these, a beginner's subset of 903 characters is clearly called out, and in this sense the book doubles as a list of "First 1000 Characters" in the curriculum...but with several twists that make it potentially of interest to the graduate student as well. In particular, all romanizations are color-coded to indicate different degrees of "tonal weighting"; this is what makes the atlas three-dimensional. Here are some details about the book's special features that set it apart from all similar-looking offerings on the market: [1] Multiple aids to situational awareness: [a] Rather than let the four tones of Mandarin be folded into a single dimension, they are made continually visible as the four columns of a 4x400 array, thus honoring them as an integral part of the "soundscape." [b] For the romanized entry that accompanies each character, Dr. Boyce lets the color of its font provide an extra layer of information as follows: If there is a SINGLE second-tone word in the language, he prints the entry in red: tang. If there are SEVERAL second-tone tang-words, then he prints the entry in black: tang. If there is a PLETHORA of second-tone tang-words, then in green: tang. And so on. By internalizing this "tonal weighting," the student develops 3D awareness about where s/he is in the soundscape. [2] Avoidance of the 1-character 1-word fallacy: In certain contexts, an adult could infer that 'hazel' and 'wal' were meant as ad hoc abbreviations of 'hazelnut' and 'walnut'; but that fact would hardly justify us teaching a child that "A wal is a kind of nut," as though wal were a legitimate word. In this volume, the author is at pains to point out every hazel- or wal-type situation, rather than gloss over it, as usually happens in books that introduce h]an-z]i to foreigners. [3] Dr. Boyce has carefully chosen his "First 1000 Characters" for their pertinence to the soundscape as it exists in the head of the native speaker. At its core, his list of 1000 overlaps with other such lists, but around the "edges" it is significantly different, as a consequence of that premise.
A Guide to China's Cosmopolitan Age
Language: en
Pages: 48
Authors: Chung-wen Shih, Andrew H. Plaks, Annenberg/CPB Project, George Washington University. Department of East Asian Languages, Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Categories: Art, Chinese
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher:

Presents an overview of China's Tang dynasty, its history, civilization, arts, and culture, A.D. 618-907. A companion volume to the television program, "China's cosmopolitan age : The Tang," broadcast over the PBS network.
Cosmopolitanism in China, 1600–1950
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: Minghui Hu , Johan Elverskog
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-01-28 - Publisher: Cambria Press

At the height of the Cultural Revolution and the Cold War in 1971, the historian Joseph Levenson made the astute observation that China used to be cosmopolitan on account of Confucianism. At that time, the notion of China, much less Confucianism, as somehow being cosmopolitan may have surprised many of his readers, especially because so many conventional ideas about China-ranging from its "kith and kin" social structure to its purportedly eternal and monolithic state structure-seem to reflect a society that was the very antithesis of cosmopolitanism. Indeed, even now, or perhaps even more so now on account of growing Chinese nationalism, Han chauvinism, and global fears of a rising China, the idea of Chinese cosmopolitanism may strike many as ill conceived.Levenson, as with so much of his scholarship, was clearly on to something important. In fact, in the current academic climate it seems almost irresponsible not to address this. This book is therefore a much-needed pioneering attempt to explore the implications and possibilities of Levenson's potent observation regarding China in relation to the growing scholarship on cosmopolitanism around the world. It is an important intervention in both the current scholarship on modern China and the scholarship on cosmopolitanism in its global articulations.
Challenging Cosmopolitanism
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: R. Michael Feener
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-03-14 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

The first study of nineteenth-century replication across art, literature, science, social science and humanities
Cosmopolitanism in Hard Times
Language: en
Pages: 432
Authors: R. Michael Feener
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-15 - Publisher: BRILL

While each chapter seizes the dialectic of enlightenment and counter-enlightenment at work in the global world, the volume insists on the moral, intellectual, structural, and historical resources that still make cosmopolitanism a real possibility even in these hard times.
Textiles and Clothing of Viö_št Nam
Language: en
Pages: 228
Authors: Michael C. Howard
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-08-11 - Publisher: McFarland

Việt Nam is the home of more than fifty ethnic minorities—such as the Chăm and Thái—many of which have distinctive clothing and weaving traditions linked to antiquity. The tight-fitting tunic called áo dài, widely recognized as a national symbol, has its roots in the country’s 2,000–year history of textiles. Beginning with silk production in the Bronze Age cultures of the Red River, this book covers textiles in Việt Nam—including bark-cloth, kapok and hemp—through the centuries of Chinese rule in the north, a number of independent feudal societies and the brief period of French colonial rule.
The Cosmopolitan Dream
Language: en
Pages: 260
Authors: Derek Hird, Geng Song
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-09-06 - Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

The Cosmopolitan Dream presents the broad patterns in the transformations of mainland Chinese masculinity over recent years, covering both representations (in film, fiction, and on television) and the lived experiences of Chinese men on four continents. Exposure to transnational influences has made Chinese notions of masculinity more cosmopolitan than ever before, yet the configurations of these hybrid masculinities retain the imprint of Chinese historical models. With the increasing interconnectivity of markets around the world, the hegemonic mode of manhood is now a highly mobile transnational business form of masculinity. However, the fusion of this kind of cosmopolitanism with Chinese characteristics has not diminished the conventional class and gender privileges for educated men. On the other hand, the traditionally prized intellectual masculinity in Chinese culture, which did not hold commerce in high regard, has reconciled with today’s business values. Together these factors shape the outlook of the contemporary generation of Chinese elites. At the same time globalization has increased the cross-country mobility of blue-collar Chinese men, who may possess a masculine ideal that is different from their white-collar counterparts. Therefore it is important to examine various types of masculinity with the recent, reform-era mainland Chinese migration. The migrant man—whether he is a worker, student, pop idol, or writer (all cases studied in this volume)—could face challenges to his masculinity based on his race, class, intimate partners, or fatherhood. The strategies adopted by the Chinese men to reinvent their masculine identities in these stories offer much insight into the complex connections between masculinity and the rapid socioeconomic developments of postsocialist China. “The Cosmopolitan Dream provides a rich and multidisciplinary window into how Chinese masculinities are both shaping and being shaped by a new era of globalization, one in which circulations of Chinese capital, images, and people play an ever more important role. This is an insightful and engaging work that makes important contributions to the study of media, gender, migration, and globalization more broadly.” —John Osburg, University of Rochester “A pioneering contribution toward understanding transnational Chinese masculinities. Covering both imagined representations and the actual experience of migrating Chinese men, this volume is definitely greater than the sum of its parts in conveying the contents and significance of cosmopolitanism to Chinese masculinities.” —Harriet Zurndorfer, Leiden University